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Couscous Salad
Couscous Salad

Couscous Salad with Roasted Pimento, Olive, and Pomegranate

With summer upon us, a fresh, tasty, and filling salad makes the perfect simple lunch or no-fuss dinner. This vegan salad is quick and easy to make with a nice citrus zing and depth with added crunch coming from the pomegranate seeds.

Couscous along with the olives and olive oil is a staple in most Mediterranean countries and has great nutritional values by way of vitamins E and K, antioxidants and monounsaturated fats. To name just a few! The pomegranate seeds not only add a super crunch to the salad, but they also add more antioxidants and vitamins.

If you wanted to make this salad even more luxurious, it works very well with goats cheese or halloumi. Alternatively, you can add grilled chicken breast or a fish filet and serve with an extra squeeze of fresh lemon.

Tips 

  • The best and easiest way to remove the seeds from a pomegranate is to cut in half and hold the cut side down towards the bowl. Hit the top of the pomegranate with the back of a spoon or spatula.

Spencer WestcottAuthorSpencer WestcottCategorySalads

 3 medium bell peppers
 10 green nocellara olives, pits removed and sliced
 1 pomegranate, seeds removed
 1 ½ cups couscous
 1 tsp garlic, minced
 1 tsp apple cider vinegar
 1 tbsp virgin olive oil
 1 ½ boiling water
 1 lemon, zest and juice
 salt and pepper to taste
 1 tbsp chopped parsley

1

Place the couscous and garlic in a large bowl. Pour over the hot water and virgin olive oil and shake to level out the couscous. Cover tightly with cling film and set aside.

2

Over a naked flame or blowtorch, scorch the outside of the peppers to blacken the skins. Set aside on a plate and allow to cool.

3

Once cool enough to handle, remove the skins and break the peppers into quarters. Remove any seeds and membranes from the peppers.

4

Cut the pomegranate in half horizontally and remove the seeds into a clean bowl. Pick through the seeds to remove any membrane.

5

Remove the cling film from the couscous and add the lemon juice, chopped parsley, lemon zest, and vinegar. Use a fork to fluff up the couscous and mix and combine the flavors.

6

Taste and then season with salt and pepper.

7

Julienne half the roasted peppers and roughly chop the other half. These can be added to the couscous along with the sliced olives, and mixed through, if being served family-style in a large bowl or if making individual plates, layered up in a ring or mold.

8

Serve with grilled crusty bread.

Ingredients

 3 medium bell peppers
 10 green nocellara olives, pits removed and sliced
 1 pomegranate, seeds removed
 1 ½ cups couscous
 1 tsp garlic, minced
 1 tsp apple cider vinegar
 1 tbsp virgin olive oil
 1 ½ boiling water
 1 lemon, zest and juice
 salt and pepper to taste
 1 tbsp chopped parsley

Directions

1

Place the couscous and garlic in a large bowl. Pour over the hot water and virgin olive oil and shake to level out the couscous. Cover tightly with cling film and set aside.

2

Over a naked flame or blowtorch, scorch the outside of the peppers to blacken the skins. Set aside on a plate and allow to cool.

3

Once cool enough to handle, remove the skins and break the peppers into quarters. Remove any seeds and membranes from the peppers.

4

Cut the pomegranate in half horizontally and remove the seeds into a clean bowl. Pick through the seeds to remove any membrane.

5

Remove the cling film from the couscous and add the lemon juice, chopped parsley, lemon zest, and vinegar. Use a fork to fluff up the couscous and mix and combine the flavors.

6

Taste and then season with salt and pepper.

7

Julienne half the roasted peppers and roughly chop the other half. These can be added to the couscous along with the sliced olives, and mixed through, if being served family-style in a large bowl or if making individual plates, layered up in a ring or mold.

8

Serve with grilled crusty bread.

Couscous Salad with Roasted Pimento, Olive, and Pomegranate
Spencer Westcott
A multi-ethnic trained chef, Spencer began his classical training at Thanet College (now East Kent College) before heading to London and working his way up the ladder gaining the knowledge and experience needed. Starting as a commis saucier at The Ritz Club at the Ritz Hotel, the journey took him to a number of the high-end restaurants, casinos and private members clubs within London to include the British version of Iconic USA steakhouse group ‘The Palm’ as executive chef. After 24 years behind the stove, he is consulting privately while preparing exquisite recipes for Dish Miami.

Photo credit: Ruben Cabrera

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Photo credit: Ruben Cabrera

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